Day 1
Teacher: Mauriah Smith

Grade: 1st Grade

Subject: Comprehension

Reading Strategy: Visualization

1. Learning Objectives
  • What are your objectives for student learning in this lesson? That is, what do you intend students to learn?
    • By the end of this lesson, the students will be able to visualize what is taking place in stories.
    • By the end of this lesson, the students will be able to develop pictures in their heads about what has been read.
  • Why have you chosen these objectives?
    • We have chosen these learning objectives because they align with the Sunshine State Standards we intend to follow.
  • What Standards (National or State) relate to this lesson?
    • LA.1.1.7.5
      • The student will distinguish fact from fiction and cause from effect.
        • (Visualize-what you see when you read. When the students visualize, they should be able to tell the teachers if what they are seeing is considered something that could be seen in the real world or something that is fictional.)
    • LA.1.1.7.9
      • The student will self monitor comprehension and reread when necessary.
        • (The students will use self monitoring when they are asked to visualize different parts of the story.)
    • LA.1.5.2.3
      • The student will listen attentively to fiction and nonfiction read-alouds and demonstrate understanding.
        • (While the story is being read to the students, they will have to listen carefully so they can visualize what is happening in the story when they are asked. When students are asked to visualize, they are demonstrating their understanding of the story.)

2. Content Knowledge
  • What content knowledge do you possess in this area?
    • The teachers have to have knowledge on what fluent reading looks and sounds like. When a person is reading fluently they sound just like they do when they are talking to someone. Teachers also have to know how to help the students learn how to visualize. For example, some students may visualize better when they have their eyes closed. The teachers will also have to read the story beforehand to know where they plan to stop and ask the students to visualize. The teachers should also practice the story beforehand so they can read with prosody and intonation, which will help the students remained engaged and interested while listening.
  • How did you prepare for understanding the content of this lesson?
    • We conversed with the classroom teacher about what she has been teaching the students about fluent reading. We also had to decide what story we were going to use for the read aloud. We had to research the reading strategy we were going to teach (visualizing). Lastly we had to decide how we were going to keep the students engage and interested while we read the story.

3. Student Grouping
  • How will you group students for instruction?
    • The type of grouping we will use for this lesson is whole group and small group.
  • Why have you chosen this grouping?
    • We have chosen this whole group because we will be using the SMARTboard to model fluent reading and to allow the students to follow along as we read. Since there is only one SMARTboard in the classroom, we will have to use whole group instruction as our grouping method.
    • We have chosen small group because we have a center activity that will be incorporating visualizing. For this center, four or five of the students will be there at one time. This grouping makes answering student questions more efficient, and also reduces the teacher to student ratio.

4. Methods
  • What teaching method(s) will you use for this lesson?
    • The teaching methods that will be used during this lesson are:
      • Questioning (Level 1: Recall; Knowledge and Comprehension)
      • Modeling
      • Visualizing [Levels 1 (Recall), 2 (Skill/concept), 3 (Strategic thinking), and 4 (Extended thinking); Knowledge, comprehension, application, synthesis, evaluation]
  • What students need specific accommodations in this lesson?
    • The students who need specific accommodations during this lesson are:
      • Michael
      • Jalen
      • Dalton
      • Zamari
      • Myran
      • Cody

  • What specific accommodations have you made for these student needs?
    • Michael- He will need a seating accommodation during whole group instruction because of his physical limitations. Michael will also need the help of his para-professional during whole group instruction to ensure understanding. During small group, Michael will be shown three pictures. He will have to point to the picture that represents a giant, one that represents Jack, and one that represents a beanstalk. This will help provide Michael with a visual understanding of what each is. After he correctly identifies the three pictures, he will be provided with a Jack and the Beanstalk coloring sheet, so he can take part in the coloring as well. During the center activity, Michael will need his chair and desk modifications.
    • Jalen- He will need to have his smiley chart with him while on the rug (during whole group instruction) and during the center activity. He will also need the help of his para-professional to ensure he is on task and paying attention during the lesson.
    • Dalton- He will need his individual behavior chart to ensure that he is on task, following directions, paying attention, and participating when asked. He will need to take his behavior chart to the center activity as well for the same reasons as above.
    • Cody, Zamari, and Myran- They will need their individual behavior charts to ensure that they are on task, following directions, paying attention, and displaying positive behavior. They will need to take their behavior charts to the center activity as well for the same reasons as above.
  • Why have you chosen this method or these methods?
    • We chose questioning because we will be asking students the think and respond questions at the end of the story. We will also be asking the students to visualize periodically throughout the story.
    • We chose modeling because while we are reading we will be modeling how fluent reading sounds like. We will also be modeling how to track while we read as well as thinking aloud during reading.
    • We chose visualizing because this is what we will be focusing on during the lesson. We will model how to visualize when we are not given any pictures to see. We will also be having the students visualize while we are reading the story.
5. Activities
What activities have you planned?

WHOLE GROUP LESSON (READ ALOUD)

Activity
Time Allowed/Level of Cognitive Task
Opening
The teachers will introduce the strategy that the students will be learning about.
Today we are going to learn how to visualize while we read stories with no pictures for us to look at. Visualizing can help us understand and comprehend what is going on in the story.
The teachers will introduce the story.
The story we are going to read and visualize with is called “Jack and the Beanstalk.” “Jack and the Beanstalk” is a fairy tale. A fairy tale is a tale that is written especially for children, with make-believe characters and events.
Next the teachers will introduce the Expanded Vocabulary so that the students will know what these words mean when they are listening to the story (widow, chap, content, rogue).
Some vocabulary words you will need to know for this story are widow, chap, content, and rogue. A widow is a woman whose husband has died. A chap is a boy or man. Content means satisfied or happy. Rogue is a tricky or dishonest person.
Now we are going to begin reading the story. Remember to pay close attention as we read because we will stop throughout the story and ask you to visualize what is going on and we will ask a volunteer to share what he or she has visualized.
~5 minutes
Main Activity/Activities
During this time, Ashley will read the first half of “Jack and the Beanstalk.” She will stop a few times during the first half of the story and ask the students to visualize what is taking place in the story. Ashley will also stop at the points in the story where “think alouds” are provided. Ashley will read the think aloud to the class to ensure clarity of the information provided in the story and to model quality reading skills/strategies.
The students will be provided a wiggle break when Ashley and Sarah switch roles. We provide the students with a wiggle break because they will be sitting on the rug for a longer time than usual.
After the wiggle break, Sarah will read the second half of the story. She will stop just as Ashley did to ask the students to visualize what is happening in the story. She will also stop and read the “think aloud” to ensure students are understanding the story and to model quality reading skills/strategies.
~20-25 minutes
[Webb’s: Levels 1 (Recall), 2 (Skill/concept), 3 (Strategic thinking), and 4 (Extended thinking); Bloom’s: Knowledge, comprehension, application, synthesis, evaluation]
Closing
To close this read aloud, Sarah and Ashley will simultaneously ask the “Think and Respond” questions at the end of the story.
~3-5 minutes
Important Questions to Ask
THESE QUESTIONS WILL BE ASKED DURING THE CLOSING PART OF THIS LESSON.
Would you have climbed that beanstalk the third time if you were Jack? Why or why not? (After students provide their answers, Ashley can provide an answer she came up with.)

Why do children enjoy hearing fairy tales? (After students provide their answers, Sarah can provide an answer she came up with.)

This story has been around for a long time. Why do you think authors tell it over and over again? (After students provide their answers, Ashley can provide an answer she came up with.)
Webb’s: Level 3 (Strategic thinking); Bloom’s: synthesis, evaluation
Webb’s: Level 3 (Strategic thinking); Bloom’s: knowledge, comprehension, synthesis, evaluation
Webb’s: Level 3 (Strategic thinking); Bloom’s: synthesis, evaluation

SMALL GROUP STATION (DRAWING)
Opening
During the center, we will tell the students what they will be doing.
Today you are going to draw one of the visualizations we made while you made while you were listening to the story. This will give your peers and me a better understanding of what you saw in your head.
~1 minute
Main Activity/Activities
During this time, the students will draw the visualization that they can best remember from when they listened to the story, “Jack and the Beanstalk.” They can also color their pictures to make them stand out more (or match what they had visualized).
~10 minutes
Webb’s: Levels 1 (Recall), 2 (Skill/concept), 3 (Strategic thinking), Bloom’s: comprehension, application, synthesis, evaluation
Closing
The teacher will make sure the students completely understand the visualization strategy. They will answer any questions the students still have about visualizing.
The students will also be asked to clean up the station during this time.
~1 minute

6. Materials
  • What instructional materials will you use, if any?
    • The instructional materials we will use are:
      • SMARTboard
      • The Florida Treasures Interactive Read-Aloud Anthology with Plays book
      • The story: “Jack and the Beanstalk” retold by Virginia Haviland
      • Drawing paper
      • Markers and Crayons
  • Why have you chosen these materials?
    • We have chosen to use the SMARTboard because the story can be displayed for the students to see. The SMARTboard also allows the teachers to track while they read so the students know where to follow along.
    • We need the Interactive Read-Aloud Anthology with Plays book because the story is located inside that book.
    • We need the story in order to read to the students.
    • The drawing paper will be used for the center activity. The students will need the drawing paper so they can draw a scene they have visualized from the story.
    • The markers will be used so the students can make their visualizations (drawings) colorful.

7. Evaluation
  • How and when do you plan to evaluate student learning on the content of this lesson?
    • We plan to evaluate the students based on their visualizations drawn during the center activity. If their visualizations (drawings) align with the story that was read then the students comprehended the story and understand the reading strategy that had been taught. If their drawings do not align with the story “Jack and the Beanstalk” then they did not get a firm grasp of the concept of visualization or the did not comprehend the story as well as we would have liked.
  • Why have you chosen this approach to evaluation?
    • We chose to use this approach to evaluation because it allows the students to be creative. This approach is also less stressful for the students than typical pencil and paper tests.


Day 2

Teacher: Julie Holsomback

Grade: 1st Grade

Co-Teaching Method: Station Teaching

Subject: Reading


Reading Strategy: Visualization

1. Learning Objectives

What are your objectives for student learning in this lesson? That is, what do you intend students to learn?

· By the end of this lesson, the students will be able to visualize what is taking place in the literature.
· By the end of this lesson, the students will be able to develop pictures in their heads about what has been read.
· By the end of this lesson, the students will be able to use their five senses to display their comprehension of the story.
+ E.g., What would you smell? What would you hear? What could you see? What could you taste (if anything)? What would that feel like?

Why have you chosen these objectives?


We have chosen these learning objectives because they align with the Sunshine State Standards we intend to follow.

What Standards (National or State) relate to this lesson?

  • LA.1.1.7.5
+ The student will distinguish fact from fiction and cause from effect.
    • (Visualize-what you see when you read. When the students visualize, they should be able to tell the teachers if what they are seeing is considered something that could be seen in the real world or something that is fictional.)
  • LA.1.1.7.9
+ The student will self monitor comprehension and reread when necessary.
    • (The students will use self-monitoring when they are asked to visualize different parts of the poem.)

  • LA.1.5.2.3
+ The student will listen attentively to fiction and nonfiction read-alouds and demonstrate understanding.
    • (While the poem is being read to the students, they will have to listen carefully so they can visualize what is happening in the poem when they are asked. When students are asked to visualize, they are demonstrating their understanding of the literature.)

2. Content Knowledge

What content knowledge do you possess in this area?

The teachers have to have knowledge on what fluent reading looks and sounds like. When a person is reading fluently they sound just like they do when they are talking to someone. Teachers also have to know how to help the students learn how to visualize. For example, some students may visualize better when they have their eyes closed. The teachers should also practice the poem beforehand so they can read with prosody and intonation, which will help the students remained engaged and interested while listening.

How did you prepare for understanding the content of this lesson?

We conversed with the classroom teacher about what she has been teaching the students about fluent reading. We also had to decide what poem we were going to use for the read aloud. We had to research the reading strategy we were going to teach (visualizing). Lastly we had to decide how we were going to keep the students engaged and interested while we read the poem.

3. Student Grouping

How will you group students for instruction?

Small-group

Why have you chosen this grouping?

We have chosen small group because we have two center activities that will be incorporating visualizing. For these centers, four or five of the students will be there at one time. This grouping makes answering student questions more efficient, and also reduces the teacher to student ratio.

4. Methods

What teaching method(s) will you use for this lesson?

The teaching methods that will be used during this lesson are:
+ Questioning (Level 1: Recall; Knowledge and Comprehension)
+ Modeling
+ Visualizing [Levels 1 (Recall), 2 (Skill/concept), 3 (Strategic thinking), and 4 (Extended thinking); Knowledge, comprehension, application, synthesis, evaluation]

What students need specific accommodations in this lesson?

+ Michael
+ Jalen
+ Dalton
+ Zamari
+ Myran
+ Cody

What specific accommodations have you made for these student needs?

  • Michael may need the help of his para-professional during the small group activities to ensure his understanding. Michael will also need his chair and desk modifications.

  • Jalen- He will need to have his smiley chart with him during the center activities. He may also need the help of his para-professional to ensure he is on task and paying attention during the mini-lessons.

  • Dalton- He will need his individual behavior chart to ensure that he is on task, following directions, paying attention, and participating when asked.

  • Cody, Zamari, and Myran- They will need their individual behavior charts to ensure that they are on task, following directions, paying attention, and displaying positive behavior.

Why have you chosen this method or these methods?

  • We chose questioning because we will be asking the students to visualize throughout the poem.

  • We chose modeling because while we are reading we will be modeling how fluent reading sounds like. We will also be modeling how to track while we read as well as thinking aloud during reading.

  • We chose visualizing because this is what we will be focusing on during the lesson. We will model how to visualize when we are not given any pictures to see. We will also be having the students visualize while we are reading the poem.

5. Activities

What activities have you planned?

Allowed

Activities

Time/Level of Cognitive Task

Opening:

During the centers, we will tell the students what they will be doing.
Center 1:
Today, we will learn how to make pictures in our heads from what we hear/read. This is called visual imagery. Good readers use their imaginations to make images in their minds as they read, and that is one reason that reading is fun!
Center 2:
Today we are going to practice making pictures in our heads as we read. After we have read the poem, you are going to draw one picture of an image you made while you were listening to the poem. This will give your peers and me a better understanding of what you saw in your head.
~1 minute

Main Activities:

Center 1:
First, the teacher will model how to make pictures in her head for the students with a think-aloud. Ex. Something simple, such as the word “dog,” is written on the dry erase board and shown to students. The teacher writes and describes what she sees, smells, hears, feels, etc. about the dog in her mind onto the dry erase board. Then, the teacher will scaffold the students as needed during guided practice. The students will be asked to create an image in their mind of a cat that includes the elements of what they see, hear, taste, smell, feel, etc. When students have the image in their mind complete, they will be asked to share their image with their partner.
Center 2:
Before reading the poem, the teacher will have prompts written on the dry erase board to help students remember what areas to address when they visualize (What do you: See? Hear? Taste? Smell? Feel?) The teacher will then read the poem, The Shell, to students (attached). After reading the poem aloud with students, they will be given a worksheet on which to draw their most vivid mental image. Students will be asked to address the elements listed on the dry erase board. Volunteers will be asked to share their pictures with the group.
~10 minutes
- Visualizing [Webb’s: Levels 1 (Recall), 2 (Skill/concept), 3 (Strategic thinking), and 4 (Extended thinking); Bloom’s: Knowledge, comprehension, application, synthesis, evaluation]

Closing:

Centers 1 & 2:
Be sure to explain to students that no one will have the exact same image in their heads because we have all had different experiences. Our experiences are what help us make those images in our heads.
The teacher will make sure the students completely understand the visualization strategy. They will answer any questions the students still have about visualizing.
The students will also be asked to clean up the stations during this time.
~1-2 minutes

Important questions to ask (During the Closing Portion + Level of Cognitive Task):

  • How do you think making pictures in your mind helps you to understand what you are reading? (Webb’s Level 3-strategic thinking; Bloom’s Knowledge, comprehension, application, and evaluation)

  • What areas do we need to think about as we are making pictures in our minds? (What is seen, smelled, tasted, heard, and felt.) (Webb’s Level 1-recall; Bloom’s Knowledge)

  • How can this help you in your writing as well? (Webb’s Level 3-strategic thinking; Bloom’s Knowledge, comprehension, application, and evaluation)

6. Materials

What instructional materials will you use, if any?

Dry erase boards (one for each center)
Dry erase markers
The poem, The Shell, by Jennifer Jones
Mental Image Worksheets (18 copies)
Markers

Why have you chosen these materials?

  • We will need the dry erase boards and markers so that students may have a visual aid to prompt them as they practice and learn the strategy. We will also use the dry erase boards for modeling the strategy.

  • We need the poem in order to read to the students.

  • The mental image worksheet will be used so that students can draw a scene they have visualized from the poem.

  • The markers will be used so the students can make their visualizations (drawings) colorful.

7. Evaluation

How and when do you plan to evaluate student learning on the content of this lesson?

  • We plan to informally evaluate students in center one through teacher observations. The teacher will listen as students share their mental images with one another to make sure that they understand the strategy and the amount of detail involved (addressing the five senses when visualizing).

  • We plan to formally evaluate the students based on their visualizations drawn during the second center activity. If their visualizations (drawings) align with the poem that was read, then the students comprehended the poem and understood the reading strategy that was taught. If their drawings do not align with the poem, “The Shell,” then they did not get a firm grasp of the concept of visualization or they did not comprehend the poem as well as we would have liked.

Why have you chosen this approach to evaluation?

We chose to use this approach to evaluation because it allows the students to be creative. This approach is also less stressful for the students than typical pencil and paper tests.

Materials Used:

THE SHELL
By Jennifer Jones

At the beach
a little boy
picks up a shell.
It is twisted
pink and grey
and sandy inside.
He wonders
who lived in it
before it was washed up
from the sea.

Mental Image Worksheet:

Name: _

This is my most vivid mental image:

[Students draw visualizations here]